All posts tagged: etiquette

How to Write Clear and Elegant “Plus One” Wording for Your Invitations #invitations #plusone #invitationwording #etiquette #DIY

How to Write Clear and Elegant “Plus One” Wording for Your Invitations

Let’s talk for a minute about the bane of wedding invites: plus ones. If you’ve ever drafted a guest list, you most likely know that plus ones can be a big problem. In a perfect world, sure, we’d love to have everyone bring someone along. But the unfortunate fact is, often there’s just not enough room in the budget for the extra space, food, drinks, and favors that plus ones take up. As a result, decisions have to be made about who can bring a guest and who will have to fly solo. Learn how to write clear and elegant plus one wording here: Who Traditionally Gets a Plus One? This will purely come down to your own decision-making, but typically any guest who is married should be able to bring their spouse; guests who are engaged should be able to bring their betrothed, and guests who have been living with a partner for a long time should be able to bring that person. Besides these generalities, who gets a plus one will be entirely …

invitation wording for no host retirement, party, anniversary, birthday and other events, evites, email invitations

Invitation Wording for when Guests Pay for their Meal

How do you word an invitation to an event where guests pay for their dinner? I received this question from a Sendo reader… Amanda Asks… “I am planning a small (20 or less) retirement party for my mom at a restaurant but guests will be responsible for paying for their own dinner – how do I indicate this on an invitation?” Anyone have any suggestions? Comment to this post to help her out! It would be great to hear what you guys would expect to see on an invitation and how you would respond to some of the other suggestions mentioned When Invited Guests Pay for their Meal The proper term for this is No Host. Some social circles would immediately recognize and understand this term, whereas others would be confused. And if it’s a retirement party, some invitees may not be so quick to jump on Google to figure it out. Considering the informality of the event, keep invitations to something simple. You don’t want to spend $100 on invites that tell people they …